American Art Review

American Art Review is an art magazine founded and edited by Thomas R. Kellaway who published the magazine from September 1973 until November 1978. In the summer of 1992 he revived the magazine, which is published to this day.

American Art Review concentrates on American art from the colonial era until the early 1970s. It focuses especially on exhibitions of representational art in regional museums. The content is generally divided between scholarly articles on artists and advertisements from galleries.

Other articles related to "art":

Art, Class, and Value
... Art is sometimes perceived as belonging exclusively to higher social classes ... In this context, art is seen as an upper-class activity associated with wealth, the ability to purchase art, and the leisure required to pursue or enjoy it ... Petersburg illustrate this view such vast collections of art are the preserve of the rich, of governments and wealthy organizations ...
Post-Breton Surrealism
... Some art historians suggest that World War II effectively disbanded the movement ... However, art historian Sarane Alexandrian (1970) states, "the death of André Breton in 1966 marked the end of Surrealism as an organized movement." There have also ... The former curator of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Michael Bell, has called this style "veristic Surrealism", which depicts with meticulous clarity and great detail a world ...

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