American Airlines - On-board Service

On-board Service

American Coach class cabin

On domestic flights and flights to Canada, Central America, and areas in the Caribbean (including the Dominican Republic), American Airlines offers a buy on board program offering sandwiches and snacks for purchase. Flights two hours or longer have snacks, and flights three hours or longer have sandwiches. Transcontinental flights and Hawaii flights have the "Premium Sandwich and Chip Combo" for purchase. Buy on board service to Central America (From Miami) and the Dominican Republic began on March 1, 2009. American will continue to offer free coach meals on flights to Europe, Haiti, Asia, and select South American destinations.

In First and Business classes, on all domestic flights of two hours or more that operate within a traditional meal time, full meal service is included. Flights with a duration longer than two and one half hours that do not fall within a meal time have snack service for those classes. First Class and Business Class passengers receive alcoholic beverages for free. Non-alcoholic beverages are free for all classes. Alcoholic drinks are available for purchase on all domestic flights in Coach. Beer and wine are now free on long haul international flights to Europe and Asia and certain flights to South America.

Headsets are two dollars on domestic flights and free on flights to/from Europe, Asia, India and South America. Headsets are also free to passengers in First and Business Classes.

Read more about this topic:  American Airlines

Other related articles:

service" class="article_title_2">Transavia.com - Fleet - On-board Service
... Transavia.com offers the "Selection on Board" buy on board service offering food and drinks for purchase. ...
Spanair - On-board Service
... For economy-class passengers traveling within Western Europe the airline offered a buy on board service offering food and drinks for purchase. ...

Famous quotes containing the word service:

    Human life consists in mutual service. No grief, pain, misfortune, or “broken heart,” is excuse for cutting off one’s life while any power of service remains. But when all usefulness is over, when one is assured of an unavoidable and imminent death, it is the simplest of human rights to choose a quick and easy death in place of a slow and horrible one.
    Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860–1935)