Allura Red AC

Allura Red AC is a red azo dye that goes by several names including: Allura Red, Food Red 17, C.I. 16035, FD&C Red 40, 2-naphthalenesulfonic acid, 6-hydroxy-5-((2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo)-, disodium salt, and disodium 6-hydroxy-5-((2-methoxy-5-methyl-4-sulfophenyl)azo)-2-naphthalenesulfonate. It is used as a food dye and has the E number E129. Allura Red AC was originally introduced in the United States as a replacement for the use of amaranth as a food coloring.

It has the appearance of a dark red powder. It usually comes as a sodium salt, but can also be used as both calcium and potassium salts. It is soluble in water; in solution, its maximum absorbance lies at about 504 nm.p.921 Its melting point is above 300 degrees Celsius.

Allura Red AC is one of many High Production Volume Chemicals.

Red AC was originally manufactured from coal tar, but is now mostly made from petroleum. Despite the popular misconception, Allura Red AC is not derived from any insect, unlike the food colouring carmine, which is derived from the female cochineal insect.

Related dyes include Sunset Yellow FCF, Scarlet GN, tartrazine, and Orange B.

Read more about Allura Red ACHealth Effects, Regulation

Other articles related to "allura red ac, red, allura red":

Incarnadine - Red Food Coloring
... The most common synthetic food coloring today is Allura Red AC is a red azo dye that goes by several names including Allura Red, Food Red 17, C.I. 16035, FD C Red 40, It was originally manufactured from coal tar, but now is mostly made from petroleum ... In Europe, Allura Red AC is not recommended for consumption by children ...
Allura Red AC - Regulation
... In Europe, Allura Red AC is not recommended for consumption by children ... The European Union approves Allura Red AC as a food colorant, but EU countries' local laws banning food colorants are preserved ... In the United States, Allura Red AC is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in cosmetics, drugs, and food ...

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