Allied Leaders of World War II

The Allied leaders of World War II listed below comprise the important political and military figures who fought for or supported the Allies during World War II. Engaged in total war, they had to adapt to new types of modern warfare, on the military, psychological and economic fronts.

Read more about Allied Leaders Of World War IIAlbania, Belgium, Brazil, British Empire & Commonwealth, Republic of China, French Third Republic (Until 1940), Kingdom of Greece, Mexico, Second Polish Republic (Until 1939), Soviet Union, Saudi Arabia, United States of America, Kingdom of Yugoslavia, Czechoslovak Republic, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Kingdom of Denmark, Kingdom of Norway, Kingdom of The Netherlands, Kingdom of Egypt, Empire of Ethiopia, Empire of Iran, Republic of Liberia

Famous quotes containing the words war, allied, leaders and/or world:

    A democracy which makes or even effectively prepares for modern, scientific war must necessarily cease to be democratic. No country can be really well prepared for modern war unless it is governed by a tyrant, at the head of a highly trained and perfectly obedient bureaucracy.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Can love be in aught allied to dissipation? Let us love by refusing, not accepting one another. Love and lust are far asunder. The one is good, the other bad.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Unless the people can choose their leaders and rulers, and can revoke their choice at intervals long enough to test their measures by results, the government will be a tyranny exercised in the interests of whatever classes or castes or mobs or cliques have this choice.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)

    The men who are messing up their lives, their families, and their world in their quest to feel man enough are not exercising true masculinity, but a grotesque exaggeration of what they think a man is. When we see men overdoing their masculinity, we can assume that they haven’t been raised by men, that they have taken cultural stereotypes literally, and that they are scared they aren’t being manly enough.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)