All The Way (Eddie Vedder Song) - Release and Reception

Release and Reception

On September 18, 2008, "All the Way" was made available for digital download via Pearl Jam's official website for US$0.99. On approximately September 30, 2008, a CD single version was made available for purchase at select stores in the Chicago area. A souvenir 45 single format version is also a possibility. The digital download and CD single have been released with an associated single cover art image that is a modified version of the Wrigley Field outfield wall.

Philip K. Wrigley had employee Bill Veeck, Jr. add ivy to the outfield walls of Wrigley Field in September 1937. Wrigley Field is the home stadium for the Chicago Cubs, and its wall is well known for being covered in ivy except for a few select places where signs are present as well as doors to locker rooms and such. The brick is visible under the ivy at the stadium in locations where the signs designate the distance from the wall to home plate measured in feet. The cover art image replaces the distance with the words "All the Way".

By the time of the single release, local Chicago radio stations and sports bars had begun to play the song in anticipation of the 2008 Cubs' playoff run. The song is considered to be an earnest tribute to the Cubs. According to at least one source, the song is reminiscent of "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall" by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan and much less upbeat than the song "Go, Cubs, Go" by American folk music singer-songwriter Steve Goodman. The Huffington Post encourages listeners to compare the song to Goodman's "Go, Cubs, Go". Another source compares the song to American country-folk singer-songwriter John Prine's 1974 song "Dear Abby" in terms of melody and cadence as well as the theme of Goodman's "A Dying Cubs Fan’s Last Request".

At The Smashing Pumpkins' November 20, 2008 concert at the Chicago Theatre, frontman Billy Corgan criticized Vedder and the song. Corgan stated, "If the Cubs did have a chance this last year that just passed, fuckin’ Eddie Vedder killed that shit dead. Last I checked Eddie ain’t living here, okay? Eddie ain’t living here to write a song about my fuckin’ team."

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