Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Alice In Wonderland Syndrome

Alice-in-Wonderland syndrome (AIWS, named after the novel written by Lewis Carroll), also known as Todd's syndrome or lilliputian hallucinations, is a disorienting neurological condition that affects human perception. Sufferers may experience micropsia, macropsia, or size distortion of other sensory modalities. A temporary condition, it is often associated with migraines, brain tumors, and the use of psychoactive drugs. It can also present as the initial sign of the Epstein-Barr Virus (see mononucleosis). Anecdotal reports suggest that the symptoms of AIWS are fairly common in childhood, with many people growing out of them in their teens. It appears that AIWS is also a common experience at sleep onset. Alice in Wonderland Syndrome can be caused by abnormal amounts of electrical activity causing abnormal blood flow in the parts of the brain that process visual perception and texture.

Read more about Alice In Wonderland SyndromeEpidemiology, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis

Other articles related to "alice in wonderland syndrome":

Alice In Wonderland Syndrome - Prognosis
... Whatever the cause, the distortions can recur several times a day and may take some time to abate ... Understandably, the sufferer can become alarmed, frightened, even panic-stricken ...

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