Air Flow Bench

An air flow bench is a device used for testing the internal aerodynamic qualities of an engine component and is related to the more familiar wind tunnel.

Used primarily for testing the intake and exhaust ports of cylinder heads of internal combustion engines. It is also used to test the flow capabilities of any component such as air filters, carburetors, manifolds or any other part that is required to flow gas. It is one of the primary tools of high performance engine builders and porting cylinder heads would be strictly hit or miss without it.

A flow bench consists of an air pump of some sort, a metering element, pressure and temperature measuring instruments such as manometers, and various controls. The test piece is attached in series with the pump and measuring element and air is pumped through the whole system. Therefore all the air passing through the metering element also passes through the test piece. Because the volume flow rate through the metering element is known and the flow through the test piece is the same, it is also known. The mass flow rate can be calculated using the known pressure and temperature data to calculate air densities, and multiplying by the volume flow rate.

Read more about Air Flow BenchAir Pump, Metering Element, Instrumentation, Flow Bench Data, Limitations

Other articles related to "flow, air flow bench, flow bench":

Flow Cytometry - History
... The first impedance-based flow cytometry device, using the Coulter principle, was disclosed in U.S ... Mack Fulwyler was the inventor of the forerunner to today's flow cytometers - particularly the cell sorter ... The first fluorescence-based flow cytometry device (ICP 11) was developed in 1968 by Wolfgang Göhde from the University of Münster, filed for patent on 18 December 1968 and first commercialized in 1968/6 ...
Flow Cytometry - Flow Cytometers
... Modern flow cytometers are able to analyze several thousand particles every second, in "real time," and can actively separate and isolate particles having specified properties ... A flow cytometer is similar to a microscope, except that, instead of producing an image of the cell, flow cytometry offers "high-throughput" (for a large number ... A flow cytometer has five main components a flow cell - liquid stream (sheath fluid), which carries and aligns the cells so that they pass single file through the light beam for sensing a measuring ...
Flow - Other
... Flow (policy debate), a form of note-taking in policy debate Cash flow, the movement of cash into or out of a business, project, or financial product ...
Air Flow Bench - Limitations - Exhaust Port Conditions
... The flow simulated on a flow bench bears almost no similarity to the flow in a real exhaust port ... Here even the coefficients measured on flow benches are inaccurate ... This is many times more than the capabilities of a typical flow bench of 0.06 bar (6 kPa) ...
Yamabe Flow
... In differential geometry, the Yamabe flow is an intrinsic geometric flow—a process which deforms the metric of a Riemannian manifold ... It is the negative L2-gradient flow of the (normalized) total scalar curvature, restricted to a given conformal class it can be interpreted as deforming a Riemannian metric to a conformal metric of constant scalar ... It was introduced by Richard Hamilton shortly after the Ricci flow, as an approach to solve the Yamabe problem on manifolds of positive conformal Yamabe invariant ...

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