Air Bud: Golden Receiver - Plot

Plot

Several months after becoming Buddy's legal owner, Josh Framm (Kevin Zegers), now a teenager, becomes angry when his mother, Jackie, begins dating Patrick Sullivan, the town's new veterinarian after a couple of failed dates. It all starts when Sullivan innocently tosses Josh's basketball-savvy dog, Buddy, a football one day, and he discovers that Buddy also has an uncanny ability to play the sport of football. Soon enough, Buddy begins playing on Josh's Junior High football team. Meanwhile, two Russian siblings by the names of Natalya and Popov kidnap Buddy in hopes of having him perform as the special attraction in the Russian circus while Josh runs away when Patrick proposes to his mother. His coach finds him and convinces him that just because Patrick is in his life now, he doesn't have to stop loving his father and he returns home, but Patrick is gone and Buddy is missing. The Timberwolves are forced to play the final game without Buddy and are unable to win. Buddy and the other animals manage to escape and Natalya and Popov are placed into the custody of the Russian embassy after their van falls into a lake following a chase sequence. Meanwhile, Patrick finds Buddy and takes him to the game. With the help of Buddy, the team catches up, but Buddy is tackled and taken out of the game. The Timeberwolves are forced to finish the game without him and thanks to Josh and Tommy, they win. Later, Josh stops Patrick from leaving and convinces him to stay. The family later goes to a football game and Buddy sneaks onto the field.

Read more about this topic:  Air Bud: Golden Receiver

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Famous quotes containing the word plot:

    After I discovered the real life of mothers bore little resemblance to the plot outlined in most of the books and articles I’d read, I started relying on the expert advice of other mothers—especially those with sons a few years older than mine. This great body of knowledge is essentially an oral history, because anyone engaged in motherhood on a daily basis has no time to write an advice book about it.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    We have defined a story as a narrative of events arranged in their time-sequence. A plot is also a narrative of events, the emphasis falling on causality. “The king died and then the queen died” is a story. “The king died, and then the queen died of grief” is a plot. The time sequence is preserved, but the sense of causality overshadows it.
    —E.M. (Edward Morgan)

    James’s great gift, of course, was his ability to tell a plot in shimmering detail with such delicacy of treatment and such fine aloofness—that is, reluctance to engage in any direct grappling with what, in the play or story, had actually “taken place”Mthat his listeners often did not, in the end, know what had, to put it in another way, “gone on.”
    James Thurber (1894–1961)