Air Bud: Golden Receiver - Home Video Release

Home Video Release

This film was released to VHS in 1998, and was later released to DVD in 2000. Disney continued its line of Air Bud Special Edition DVDs with the release of Air Bud: Golden Receiver Special Edition on February 2, 2010. The special edition includes a play-by-play action exclusive Sports Channel by the Buddies (the pups of Air Bud), led by Budderball.

Read more about this topic:  Air Bud: Golden Receiver

Other articles related to "home video release, home video, release, home":

Splash, Too - Home Video Release
... Splash, Too was released on home video (VHS tape) in the United Kingdom (region 2, PAL format) and Australia (region 4, PAL) by Walt Disney Home Video ... Both the UK release and Australian release have been out of print for many years, but sometimes show up on auction sites ... There has been no official home entertainment release of any form (VHS, DVD or Blu-ray) in North America (region 1, NTSC format) from Walt Disney Home Entertainment ...
Henry: Portrait Of A Serial Killer - Censorship
... The film was classified 18 for theatrical release in April 1991, but only if 24 seconds were cut from the family massacre scene (primarily involving the shots where ... again submitted the film to the BBFC for home video classification, again with the initial 38-second edit ... again classified the film 18, waiving the 24 seconds they had cut from the theatrical release ...

Famous quotes containing the words release, home and/or video:

    The steel decks rock with the lightning shock, and shake with the
    great recoil,
    And the sea grows red with the blood of the dead and reaches for his spoil—
    But not till the foe has gone below or turns his prow and runs,
    Shall the voice of peace bring sweet release to the men behind the
    guns!
    John Jerome Rooney (1866–1934)

    His Majesty’s Government views with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people.
    —A.J. (Arthur James)

    We attempt to remember our collective American childhood, the way it was, but what we often remember is a combination of real past, pieces reshaped by bitterness and love, and, of course, the video past—the portrayals of family life on such television programs as “Leave it to Beaver” and “Father Knows Best” and all the rest.
    Richard Louv (20th century)