Agricultural Adjustment Act

The Agricultural Adjustment Act (sometimes called "Triple A") was a United States federal law of the New Deal era which restricted agricultural production by paying farmers subsidies not to plant part of their land (that is, to let a portion of their fields lie fallow) and to kill off excess livestock. Its purpose was to reduce crop surplus and therefore effectively raise the value of crops. The money for these subsidies was generated through an exclusive tax on companies which processed farm products. The Act created a new agency, the Agricultural Adjustment Administration, to oversee the distribution of the subsidies. It is considered the first modern U.S. farm bill.

Read more about Agricultural Adjustment ActThomas Amendment, History, Ruled Unconstitutional, Hiss Case

Other articles related to "agricultural adjustment act, act, adjustment act":

Agricultural Adjustment Act Of 1938
... The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938 (Pub.L ... alternative and replacement for the farm subsidy policies, in previous New Deal farm legislation (Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933), that had been found ... The act revived the provisions in the previous Agriculture Adjustment Act, with the exception that the financing of the law's programs would be provided ...

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