Aggregate Spend

Aggregate Spend is the process used in the USA to aggregate and monitor total amount spent by healthcare manufacturers on individual healthcare professionals and organizations (HCP/O) through payments, gifts, honoraria, travel and other means. Also often referred to as the Physician Payments Sunshine Act, this initiative is a growing body of federal and state legislations that collectively address all or some of the following goals:

(a) Provide transparency with regard to who, in the life sciences industry, is contributing what benefits to which physician;
(b) Mandate statutory reports at least once a year; and,
(c) Limit spend per physician. “Aggregate Spend” is the total, collective, cumulative amount spent by healthcare manufacturers (pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device organizations) on individual healthcare professionals and organizations through payments, gifts, honoraria, travel and other means.

Organizations monitored include (pharmaceutical, biotechnology and, in some states, medical device organizations).

Read more about Aggregate SpendU.S. Federal Laws, PPACA, U.S. State Laws, Implementation Challenges For Life Science Companies, Implementation Challenges For The Federal Government, See Also

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