Aesthetics - Computational Inference of Aesthetics

Computational Inference of Aesthetics

Since about 2005, computer scientists have attempted to develop automated methods to infer aesthetic quality of images. Typically, these approaches follow a machine learning approach, where large numbers of manually rated photographs are used to "teach" a computer about what visual properties are of relevance to aesthetic quality. The Acquine engine, developed at Penn State University, rates natural photographs uploaded by users.

Notable in this area is Michael Leyton, professor of psychology at Rutgers University. Leyton is the president of the International Society for Mathematical and Computational Aesthetics and the International Society for Group Theory in Cognitive Science and has developed a generative theory of shape.

There have also been relatively successful attempts with regard to chess and music.

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Other articles related to "computational inference of aesthetics, aesthetic, computational":

Aesthetically - Computational Inference of Aesthetics
... Since about 2005, computer scientists have attempted to develop automated methods to infer aesthetic quality of images ... photographs are used to "teach" a computer about what visual properties are of relevance to aesthetic quality ... Leyton is the president of the International Society for Mathematical and Computational Aesthetics and the International Society for Group Theory in Cognitive Science ...

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