Advance Wars: Dual Strike - Gameplay - Dual Front

Dual Front

The DS's two screens provide new ways of presenting a round of battle in Dual Strike. The bottom screen is where the main battle takes place, while the top screen is used to display the terrain and unit intelligence. However, in some missions, the top screen shows a second front. The second front is a second battle that is waged simultaneously with the battle on the lower screen, which is integral to some missions. The player can change the top screen back to the intel screen and vice versa, and units in the first front can be sent to the second. Units sent to the second front cannot, however, be sent back to the first front.

When battling on two fronts, one CO on each team takes control of one front. The CO on the second front can either be controlled by a computer or by the player. If the battle on the second front ends before the battle on the first front, the winning CO will join their teammate on the first front or other advantages will be given to the victor. Any remaining units on the second front are then added to the victor's CO power meter.

Read more about this topic:  Advance Wars: Dual Strike, Gameplay

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Advance Wars: Dual Strike - Gameplay - Dual Front
... provide new ways of presenting a round of battle in Dual Strike ... in some missions, the top screen shows a second front ... The second front is a second battle that is waged simultaneously with the battle on the lower screen, which is integral to some missions ...

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