Admission To Practice Law

An admission to practice law, also called admission to the bar in some jurisdictions, is acquired when a lawyer receives a license to practice law. Becoming a lawyer is a widely varied process around the world. Common to all jurisdictions are requirements of age and competence; some jurisdictions also require citizenship. However, the most varied requirements are those surrounding the preparation for the license, whether it includes obtaining a law degree, passing an exam, or serving in an apprenticeship. In English, admission is also called a law license. Basic requirements vary from country to country:

Read more about Admission To Practice LawEurope, The Americas

Other articles related to "admission to practice law, laws, law":

Lawyers In Poland - Admission To Practice Law - Bar Members
... Only judges, public prosecutors, notaries, professors and habilitated doctors of laws can write certoriaris to the Constitutional Tribunal in cases in which they themselves are sides ...
Admission To Practice Law - The Americas - South America - Peru
... Abogados) in Peru must be members of a local bar association, which requires an undergraduate law degree (Bachiller en Derecho, a five-year program) and a diploma (Titulo de Abogado ...

Famous quotes containing the words admission to, law, admission and/or practice:

    To be rich is to have a ticket of admission to the masterworks and chief men of each race. It is to have the sea, by voyaging; to visit the mountains, Niagara, the Nile, the desert, Rome, Paris, Constantinople: to see galleries, libraries, arsenals, manufactories.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    Nature’s law says that the strong must prevent the weak from living, but only in a newspaper article or textbook can this be packaged into a comprehensible thought. In the soup of everyday life, in the mixture of minutia from which human relations are woven, it is not a law. It is a logical incongruity when both strong and weak fall victim to their mutual relations, unconsciously subservient to some unknown guiding power that stands outside of life, irrelevant to man.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)

    The admission of Oriental immigrants who cannot be amalgamated with our people has been made the subject either of prohibitory clauses in our treaties and statutes or of strict administrative regulations secured by diplomatic negotiations. I sincerely hope that we may continue to minimize the evils likely to arise from such immigration without unnecessary friction and by mutual concessions between self-respecting governments.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    God forbid that any book should be banned. The practice is as indefensible as infanticide.
    Rebecca West (1892–1983)