Academic Boycott of South Africa

The academic boycott of South Africa comprised a series of boycotts of South African academic institutions and scholars initiated in the 1960s, at the request of the African National Congress, with the goal of using such international pressure to force the end South Africa's system of apartheid. The boycotts were part of a larger international campaign of "isolation" that eventually included political, economic, cultural and sports boycotts. The academic boycotts ended in 1990, when its stated goal of ending apartheid was achieved.

During the apartheid era, the boycotts were debated within anti-apartheid circles as to whether they were ethically justified and appropriate. Other critics of the boycott were various conservative groups worldwide who "disliked such anti-apartheid initiatives", and campus libertarians who "perceived a loss of academic freedom".

Subsequent research in the post-apartheid area has claimed that the boycotts were more a "symbolic gesture of support" for anti-apartheid efforts rather than a direct influencer of the situation. Additionally, the academic boycott was perceived by the targets of the boycott, South Africa scholars, as unjust and discriminatory.

Read more about Academic Boycott Of South AfricaMotivation, Apartheid-era Debate, Post-Apartheid Analysis, Comparisons To Academic Boycotts of Israel

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Academic Boycott Of South Africa - Comparisons To Academic Boycotts of Israel
... The academic boycott of South Africa is frequently invoked as a model for more recent efforts to organize academic boycotts of Israel ... Some invoke the comparison to claim that an academic boycott of Israel should not be controversial based a misconception that the academic boycott of South Africa ... Andrew Beckett writes, in the Guardian, on this frequent mistaken comparison "In truth, boycotts are blunt weapons ...

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