A Visit To Kennedy Space Center Will Launch A New Perspective On Americas Space Program

Famous quotes containing the words perspective, americas, program, launch, visit, kennedy, space and/or center:

    No one thinks anything silly is suitable when they are an adolescent. Such an enormous share of their own behavior is silly that they lose all proper perspective on silliness, like a baker who is nauseated by the sight of his own eclairs. This provides another good argument for the emerging theory that the best use of cryogenics is to freeze all human beings when they are between the ages of twelve and nineteen.
    Anna Quindlen (20th century)

    The only history is a mere question of one’s struggle inside oneself. But that is the joy of it. One need neither discover Americas nor conquer nations, and yet one has as great a work as Columbus or Alexander, to do.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Since the last one in a graveyard is believed to be the next one fated to die, funerals often end in a mad scramble.
    —Administration in the State of Texa, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    I had often stood on the banks of the Concord, watching the lapse of the current, an emblem of all progress, following the same law with the system, with time, and all that is made ... and at last I resolved to launch myself on its bosom and float whither it would bear me.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    When I visit again some haunt of my youth, I am glad to find that nature wears so well. The landscape is indeed something real, and solid, and sincere, and I have not put my foot through it yet.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Where there is no vision, the people perish.
    Bible: Hebrew Proverbs, 29:18.

    President John F. Kennedy quoted this passage on the eve of his assassination in Dallas, Texas; recorded in Theodore C. Sorenson’s biography, Kennedy, Epilogue (1965)

    Here were poor streets where faded gentility essayed with scanty space and shipwrecked means to make its last feeble stand, but tax-gatherer and creditor came there as elsewhere, and the poverty that yet faintly struggled was hardly less squalid and manifest than that which had long ago submitted and given up the game.
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)

    Placing the extraordinary at the center of the ordinary, as realism does, is a great comfort to us stay-at-homes.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)