39th Infantry Division (United States) - The Cold War - Reorganization of 1959, The Pentomic Division - Re-organization and Re-designation of Artillery Units

Re-organization and Re-designation of Artillery Units

As a part of the reorganization of 1959 and the shift to the Combat Army Regimental System, the artillery units assigned to the Division were re-designated to their historical artillery regiments:

The 445th Field Artillery Battalion, Arkansas National Guard, was re-designated as the 1st Battalion, 206th Artillery, and was organized as a composite battalion with one battery of 105 mm towed howitzers and one battery of 155 mm towed howitzers.
The 437th Field Artillery Battalion, Arkansas National Guard, was re-designated as the 2nd Battalion, 206th Artillery and was organized as a composite battalion with one battery of 105 mm towed howitzers and one battery of 155 mm towed howitzers.
The 935th Field Artillery Battalion, Louisiana National Guard, was consolidated with the 141st Field Artillery Battalion and the consolidated unit was re-designated as the 1st Battalion, 141st Artillery. The new battalion was organized as a composite battalion with one battery of 105 mm towed howitzers and one battery of 155 mm towed howitzers.
A new battalion was created in the Arkansas National Guard from existing units, 3rd Battalion, 206th Artillery was a composite unit with one 8-inch howitzer battery and one MGR-1 Honest John rocket battery.

Read more about this topic:  39th Infantry Division (United States), The Cold War, Reorganization of 1959, The Pentomic Division

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