2008 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Playoffs

The 2008 NCAA Division II National Football Championship playoffs involved 24 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of men's NCAA Division II college football.

The tournament began on November 15, 2008 and concluded on December 13, 2008 with the 2008 NCAA Division II National Football Championship game at Braly Municipal Stadium near the campus of the University of North Alabama in Florence, Alabama.

In the championship game the University of Minnesota Duluth Bulldogs defeated the Northwest Missouri State University Bearcats, 21-14.

Read more about 2008 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Playoffs:  Participants, Playoff Format, National Television Coverage, See Also, External Links

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2008 NCAA Division II National Football Championship Playoffs - External Links
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