2004 Pacific Typhoon Season

The 2004 Pacific typhoon season has no official bounds; it ran year-round in 2004, but most tropical cyclones tend to form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean between May and November. These dates conventionally delimit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the northwestern Pacific Ocean.

The scope of this article is limited to the Pacific Ocean, north of the equator and west of the international date line. Storms that form east of the date line and north of the equator are called hurricanes; see 2004 Pacific hurricane season. Tropical Storms formed in the entire west pacific basin are assigned a name by the Tokyo Typhoon Center. Tropical depressions in this basin have the "W" suffix added to their number. Tropical depressions that enter or form in the Philippine area of responsibility are assigned a name by the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA. This can often result in the same storm having two names.

Read more about 2004 Pacific Typhoon Season:  Storms, Storm Names

Other articles related to "2004 pacific typhoon season, pacific, typhoon":

2004 Pacific Typhoon Season - Storm Names - Retirement
... See also List of retired Pacific typhoon names (JMA) and List of retired Philippine typhoon names The names Sudal and Rananim were retired by the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee ...

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