2000 MTV Video Music Awards

The 2000 MTV Video Music Awards aired live on September 7, 2000, honoring the best music videos from June 12, 1999, to June 9, 2000. The show was hosted by Marlon and Shawn Wayans at Radio City Music Hall in New York City.

The 2000 show is best remembered for Tim Commerford of Rage Against the Machine climbing a piece of set scaffolding and refusing to come down after his band lost the award for Best Rock Video to Limp Bizkit. The show went to commercial while security removed Commerford, who was later arrested and forced to spend a night in jail.

Britney Spears performed her hit single Oops!...I Did It Again which went on to become one of the VMA's most iconic and controversial performances. However, she received some criticism over her skin-colored performance attire. Bizkit vocalist Fred Durst later joined Christina Aguilera onstage as a surprise guest during her performance of Come on Over Baby (All I Want Is You).

For the second year in a row DMX did not show up for his scheduled performance; as a result, Nelly's performance, originally scheduled for the pre-show, was promoted to the main event. Other highlights included Eminem performing amidst an army of "Slim Shady" lookalikes and a humorous montage dedicated to past VMA winners who had failed to repeat their previous success.

This was Aaliyah's last VMA appearance before her death a year later in August 2001 in a plane crash in the Bahamas. She won her two and only VMA awards that night, for Best Female Video and Best Video from a Film for "Try Again".

Read more about 2000 MTV Video Music AwardsAppearances

Other articles related to "2000 mtv video music awards, video":

2000 MTV Video Music Awards - Appearances
... Dre and Steven Tyler — presented Best Group Video Kid Rock and The Rock — presented Best Dance Video U2 (Bono and Larry Mullen, Jr ...

Famous quotes containing the words music and/or video:

    Good music is very close to primitive language.
    Denis Diderot (1713–1784)

    It is among the ranks of school-age children, those six- to twelve-year-olds who once avidly filled their free moments with childhood play, that the greatest change is evident. In the place of traditional, sometimes ancient childhood games that were still popular a generation ago, in the place of fantasy and make- believe play . . . today’s children have substituted television viewing and, most recently, video games.
    Marie Winn (20th century)