19th-century Philosophy

19th-century Philosophy

In the 19th century the philosophies of the Enlightenment began to have a dramatic effect, the landmark works of philosophers such as Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau influencing a new generation of thinkers. In the late 18th century a movement known as Romanticism began, it validated strong emotion as an authentic source of aesthetic experience, placing new emphasis on such emotions as trepidation, horror and terror and awe. Key ideas that sparked this change were evolution, as postulated by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Erasmus Darwin, and Charles Darwin and what might now be called emergent order, such as the free market of Adam Smith. Pressures for egalitarianism, and more rapid change culminated in a period of revolution and turbulence that would see philosophy change as well.

Read more about 19th-century Philosophy:  Brief Historical Outline

Other articles related to "philosophy":

History - 17th–20th Centuries - 19th-century Philosophy
... Main article 19th-century philosophy Later modern philosophy is usually considered to begin after the philosophy of Immanuel Kant at the beginning of the 19th century ... German philosophy exercised broad influence in this century, owing in part to the dominance of the German university system ... After Hegel's death in 1831, 19th-century philosophy largely turned against idealism in favor of varieties of philosophical naturalism, such as the ...

Famous quotes containing the word philosophy:

    A philosophy can and must be worked out with the greatest rigour and discipline in the details, but can ultimately be founded on nothing but faith: and this is the reason, I suspect, why the novelties in philosophy are only in elaboration, and never in fundamentals.
    —T.S. (Thomas Stearns)