1995 Pacific Hurricane Season - Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Ranking

Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) Ranking

ACE (104 kt2) – Storm
1 29.83 Barbara 6 5.20 Gil
2 26.53 Juliette 7 4.52 Dalila
3 10.68 Adolph 8 3.65 Cosme
4 7.93 Henriette 9 3.55 Ismael
5 6.39 Flossie 10 1.92 Erick

The table on the right shows the Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) for each storm in the season. The total ACE for the 1995 season was 100.2 x 104 kt2. The ACE is, broadly speaking, a measure of the power of the storm multiplied by the length of time it existed for, so hurricanes that lasted a long time have higher ACEs. Because several storms in the season were long-lasting or intense, the ACE of the season was near normal. The 1995 season total was the lowest since 1981, though due to a period of inactivity in the following years it has only been surpassed by four seasons.

Hurricane Barbara had the highest overall ACE of the season with a total of 29.83 x 104 kt2.

Source of data: Best track data from the National Hurricane Center's Tropical Cyclone Reports.

Read more about this topic:  1995 Pacific Hurricane Season

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