1985 American League Championship Series

The 1985 American League Championship Series was played between the Kansas City Royals and the Toronto Blue Jays from October 8 to October 16. Major League Baseball decided to extend the Championship Series in both leagues from its best-of-five (1969–1984) to the current best-of-seven format starting with this year, and it proved pivotal in the outcome of the ALCS. The Blue Jays seemingly put a stranglehold on the Series, earning a three games to one lead over the Royals after four games. However, Kansas City staged an improbable comeback, winning the next three games to win the Series four games to three. The Royals would proceed to defeat their cross-state rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals, in the World Series four games to three.

The oddsmakers favored Toronto, 8–5. During the opening pregame show, NBC Sports baseball analyst Tony Kubek was among the few who predicted a Kansas City victory, citing the Blue Jays' struggles against left-handed pitching, and the Royals' plethora of left-handed starters. This prediction was especially curious considering Kubek worked on Blue Jays television broadcasts during the regular season.

Read more about 1985 American League Championship SeriesBackground, Composite Box, Aftermath

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1985 American League Championship Series - Aftermath
... The seventh game of the series marked Blue Jays' manager Bobby Cox's last with the team, as he left the organization to become the general manager of the Atlanta Braves ... Amazingly, the Royals went on to win the 1985 World Series against the St.Louis Cardinals by again coming back from a 3–1 series deficit to take the title in seven games ... In Game 6 of the 1992 World Series, Leibrandt (playing for the Atlanta Braves) gave up the game-winning double to Dave Winfield in the eleventh inning ...

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