1977 European Cup Final

The 1977 European Cup Final was an association football match between Liverpool of England and Borussia Mönchengladbach of Germany on 25 May 1977 at the Stadio Olimpico in Rome, Italy. The showpiece event was the final match of the 1976–77 season of Europe's premier cup competition, the European Cup. Both teams were appearing in their first European Cup final, although the two sides had previously met in the 1973 UEFA Cup Final, which Liverpool won 3–2 on aggregate over two legs.

Each club needed to progress through four rounds to reach the final. Matches were contested over two legs, with a match at each team's home ground. Liverpool's victories varied from close affairs to comfortable victories. They beat the previous season's runners-up Saint-Étienne by a single goal over two legs, while they defeated FC Zürich 6–1 on aggregate in the semi-final. Borussia Mönchengladbach matches were mainly all close affairs. All but one of their ties were won by the one goal.

Watched by a crowd of 57,000, Liverpool took an early lead through Terry McDermott, but Allan Simonsen equalised for Mönchengladbach early in the second half. Liverpool regained the lead midway through the second half with a goal from Tommy Smith, and Phil Neal ensured Liverpool won the match 3–1 to secure their first European Cup. The victory was a year after they had won the UEFA Cup, which meant that Bob Paisley became the first manager to win the UEFA Cup and European Cup in successive seasons.

Other articles related to "1977 european cup final, 1977":

1977 European Cup Final - Match - Details
25 May 1977 2015 Liverpool 3–1 Borussia Mönchengladbach Stadio Olimpico, Rome Attendance 57,000 Referee Robert Wurtz (France) McDermott 28' Smith 64' Neal 82' (pen.) Report Simonsen 52 ...

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