1795–1820 in Fashion - Changes in Fashion in The Period

Changes in Fashion in The Period

1790s:

  • Women: "age of undress"; dressing like statues coming to life; filet-Greek classical hairstyle; simple muslin chemise w. ribbon; sheer; empire silhouette; pastel fabrics; natural makeup; bare arms; blonde wigs; accessorized with (to demonstrate individuality): hats, turbans, gloves, jewelry, small handbags - reticules, shawls, handkerchiefs; parasols; fans; Maja: layered skirt
  • Men: trousers w. perfect tailoring; linen; coats cutaway in the front w. long tails; cloaks; hats; the Dandy; Majo: short jacket

1800s:

  • Women: short hair; white hats; trim, feathers, lace; Egyptian and Eastern influences in jewelry and apparel; shawls; hooded-overcoats; hair: masses of curls, sometimes pulled back into a bun
  • Men: linen shirts w. high collars; tall hats; hair: short and wigless, à la Titus or Bedford Crop, but often with some long locks left coming down

1810s:

  • Women: soft, subtle, sheer classical drapes; raised back waist of high-waisted dresses; short-fitted single breasted jackets; morning dress; walking dress; evening dress; riding habits; bare bosoms and arms; hair: parted in the center, tight ringlets over the ears
  • Men: fitted, single-breasted tailcoats; cravats wrapped up to the chin; sideburns and "Brutus style" natural hair; tight breeches; silk stockings; accessorized with: gold watches, cane, hats outside.

1820s:

  • Women: dress waist lines began to drop; elaborate hem and neckline decoration; cone-shaped skirts; sleeves pinched
  • Men: overcoats/greatcoats w. fur of velvet collars; the Garrick coat; Wellington boots; jockey boots

Read more about this topic:  1795–1820 In Fashion

Famous quotes containing the words period and/or fashion:

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