16th United States Congress - Leadership - Senate

Senate

  • President: Daniel D. Tompkins (DR)
  • President pro tempore: James Barbour, (DR), until December 26, 1819
    • John Gaillard, (DR), elected January 25, 1820

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Famous quotes containing the word senate:

    What times! What manners! The Senate knows these things, the consul sees them, and yet this man lives.
    Marcus Tullius Cicero (106–43 B.C.)

    I think the Senate ought to realize that I have to have about me those in whom I have confidence; and unless they find a real blemish on a man, I do not think they ought to make partisan politics out of appointments to the Cabinet.
    Calvin Coolidge (1872–1933)

    It took six weeks of debate in the Senate to get the Arms Embargo Law repealed—and we face other delays during the present session because most of the Members of the Congress are thinking in terms of next Autumn’s election. However, that is one of the prices that we who live in democracies have to pay. It is, however, worth paying, if all of us can avoid the type of government under which the unfortunate population of Germany and Russia must exist.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)